Archive for May, 2004

May 31, 2004

Made it back from stunning Redwood National Park late this afternoon.

Stats.
Albino snails seen: 5
Banana slugs seen: 6
Number of times almost stepped on elk droppings: 3
Encounters with the mythical Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox: 4
Kangaroo eaten: 1
Afternoons spent in Ashland, Oregon: 1
Hours spent sitting on driftwood on Hidden Beach: 3
Stones thrown while waiting for the sun to go down on Hidden Beach: 55
Miles driven: almost 900

In sum, a good trip.

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May 28, 2004

Am leaving the city to dwell amongst the trees in the Redwood National Park for the weekend. Hrm hoom.

May 21, 2004

Slight snag in my plans for the next few months–I may be spending the summer in the city. Boo.

May 19, 2004

Just hit a brick wall.
Writer’s block sucks.

May 19, 2004

It’s funny how I just have a paper and an assignment due tomorrow, just two more hurdles to jump, before I graduate, and even tho they’re in the works, I haven’t been able to bring myself to finish them just yet. Procrastination at its finest–in the eleventh hour. Argh.

May 15, 2004

A beautiful day beckons, but so do six reports, a research proposal and an assignment. All with deadlines for early next week. One last weekend of work before I graduate!

May 11, 2004




Views of my room, through the “fish.”

May 10, 2004

These are the kinds of pebbles I had in the front yard of my childhood home. Hundreds of them filled up a stream that snaked around askew bonsai trees, stone lanterns and tufts of thick Japanese grass. I liked picking them up every once in a while, to feel how smooth they were in my hand.

May 10, 2004

I love salty pretzels.

Hey, does anyone have a pack I can borrow, i.e., the kind for backpacking/tripping? Am not taking too much on my trip, so a medium-sized one, maybe–at least 2500 cubic inches in volume.

May 6, 2004

“Railway termini are our gates to the glorious and the unknown. Through them we pass out into adventure and sunshine, and to them, alas! We return.”
— E. M. Forster, from Howard’s End, 1910